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St. Paul police screen Zootopia as part of anti-bias training.

Home Forums MNFurs Discussions St. Paul police screen Zootopia as part of anti-bias training.

This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Cliff Cliff 6 days ago.

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #48450 Quote
    http://www.fox9.com/news/259936224-story
    Not only have St. Paul police been exposed to the one of the most successful furry movies of all time, it also opens up a way to understand and deal with a sensitive topic in our area, especially in and around the Twin Cities metro.
    #48484 Quote
    This is a horrible idea.

    – Any attempt to normalize furries will backfire, because dreasing up and pretending to be cartoon animals isn’t normal.

    – Anti-Bias training is pseudo scientific.  The replication rate for such training and programs is hardly scientific.  In fact it has shown to have the opposite effect… I assume because people don’t like being hauled off into mandatory re-education to alter their fundamental perceptions.

    In case it hadn’t already been obvious, the appeal of furries is nothing new.  Disney, old cartoons, and movies today use furries because people like them.  They’re cute.  I think forcing people to watch a good movie isn’t gonna make them any less biased toward furries than they already are.  Where’s the evidence for this?  We’ve had movies like Zootopia for decades and yet the perception of the fandom remains tainted.  In fact such viewing may confuse the trainees even more and thus create more bias.

     

    All in all, this is a horrible idea and will have the no effect or the opposite effect of what us intended.

    #48485 Quote

    This is a horrible idea. – Any attempt to normalize furries will backfire, because dreasing up and pretending to be cartoon animals isn’t normal. – Anti-Bias training is pseudo scientific. The replication rate for such training and programs is hardly scientific. In fact it has shown to have the opposite effect… I assume because people don’t like being hauled off into mandatory re-education to alter their fundamental perceptions. In case it hadn’t already been obvious, the appeal of furries is nothing new. Disney, old cartoons, and movies today use furries because people like them. They’re cute. I think forcing people to watch a good movie isn’t gonna make them any less biased toward furries than they already are. Where’s the evidence for this? We’ve had movies like Zootopia for decades and yet the perception of the fandom remains tainted. In fact such viewing may confuse the trainees even more and thus create more bias. All in all, this is a horrible idea and will have the no effect or the opposite effect of what us intended.

    Any attempt to normalize gays will backfire, because sexual intercourse between two men isn’t normal. Oh, wait, get something into the public eye and call it normal for long enough, and people start to accept it. Same will be true for furry culture.

    Also, what? The point of showing the movie wasn’t to normalize furries, it was to point out the central themes of the movie in a way that wouldn’t feel like an attack on the officers–those themes being racial profiling, people being forced into certain styles of living, and corruption in government and in the police force.

    #48486 Quote

    Any attempt to normalize gays will backfire, because sexual intercourse between two men isn’t normal. Oh, wait, get something into the public eye and call it normal for long enough, and people start to accept it. Same will be true for furry culture. Also, what? The point of showing the movie wasn’t to normalize furries, it was to point out the central themes of the movie in a way that wouldn’t feel like an attack on the officers–those themes being racial profiling, people being forced into certain styles of living, and corruption in government and in the police force.

     

    Being gay ISN’T normal.  That’s the point.  Fighting for acceptance versus normality is a huge convolution of goals and I question what your motives are; to be tolerated or to be mandatorily accepted by asserting yourself until people give up.

    Furthermore, I still do not understand why they have to watch Zootopia in order to understand those themes.  A documentary would be of greater use, if it is of any act all.

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 13 hours ago by Profile photo of Collin Collin.
    #48488 Quote
    Actually, being straight, or gay, or bi, or zoo, is all normal. It’s part of nature, and it all occurs at high enough frequencies that it requires willful blindness to consider any of it ‘not normal’. It’s been proved time and again that ‘normal’ as an idea of how people should be doesn’t exist. You can arbitrarily assign meaning to ‘normal’, but that doesn’t make it true. Now, if you’re talking pure physiology, it is normal for a human to have two legs, two arms, a head, and to eat, sleep, piss, and shit, and to have a general level of consciousness that allows for the performing of basic daily tasks. If you’re talking orientation, tastes, interests, abilities, skill sets (beyond the very basics of performing necessary to survive daily tasks), etc., then there is no ‘normal’, except as a non-universal man-made construct.

     

    Also, watching Zootopia to discuss and bring up those topics is more useful than watching a documentary, because it keeps them entertained and they get involved in it. A documentary is boring, and it doesn’t show them those topics in a natural feeling way. Meaning, they have discovered that the police department had a significantly more positive response to watching the movie than they ever had to documentaries and/or other methods of raising awareness on those issues, and they’re looking to use that going forward in the hopes that it is successful in more locations than just St. Paul.

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 10 hours ago by Profile photo of Erdrick Erdrick.
    #48490 Quote
    Heterosexuality is the norm.  I never said being gay was unnatural.  I just said it wasn’t the norm.  And it isn’t.  Because by what I am defining, normal is what is generally most expected or common among people.  It’s the norm in so far as it is what is expected.  The only defense furries have for their behavior when compared to the average person is the relativity of normality.  But if normal doesn’t exist why do furries keep desiring to replace it?  It isn’t a disorder, like autism, in which you can’t control.  It isn’t a sexual orientation, biologically constrained to yourself.  So why are we seeking to normalize what is essentially personal enjoyment and hobbies?  Be and let be.  Why do you have to take the title of normal at all?
    #48491 Quote

    Baseball is considered normal. Football, socker, hockey, basketball. These are done for personal enjoyment and as hobbies when not done professionally, and often even then. Same with watching them played. Normal implies that something is not broken, or wrong. When you say that something isn’t normal, without any other qualifiers, you are saying that it is wrong, unnatural, or immoral. There are far better word choices to use to indicate that something is less common than something else without including negative connotations.

    Also, why are you even here if all you want to talk about is how furries and non-straight people aren’t normal and furries should try to stay hidden because if the public knew about them it would backfire? One of the big themes I’ve seen on the mnfurs forum is public exposure as a way to improve the public image of furries, as most of what people know on the subject they learned from TV–which is to say mostly negative stereotypes.

    And you’re using ‘normal’ in precisely the way I said is pointless, as an artificial construct with no real truth behind it, just your own opinion.

    #48495 Quote
    @resolutionblaze, please keep in mind that this is a community where furry culture is welcomed, and from my personal experience, is also closely intertwined with the LGBT community. Disrespecting either of these will not get you far here. I almost want to say that you joined here specifically to make these divisive remarks.

    All I wanted to share was a beloved movie’s positive message and how it can be used for the greater good. If it takes cartoon animals to portray that message, so what? You did say the appeal of furries was nothing new, so I don’t see why that appeal can’t be channeled into a creative and useful outlet. I don’t believe the reaction of the SPPD was to instantly chastise furries when seeing this movie, either.

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